Midsummer

We’ve just had the summer solstice and the longest day of the year. We’ve been enjoying some beautiful and sunny warm weather this June, which seems to have continued on from spring. It feels like summer has been here for a while now.

The garden is in full bloom, bursting with Roses, honeysuckles and an assortment of beautiful flowering perennials. Colourful annual plants are tumbling out of pots and hanging baskets.

The lovely warm weather has made it a joy to be out in the garden every day either tending and tidying plants or simply relaxing and enjoying the birds and flowers.

Lots of you have been asking about my health and I’ve deliberately kept quiet on this front, as I don’t want to jinx anything, but I’ve been feeling much better now than I have in a very long time. After all the battles with rejection, infections and pneumonias of the last year or so, somehow I’ve pushed through and things seem steadier now and I’m feeling much fitter and stronger.

The weather has certainly been a good motivation for getting out and about and increasing my exercise capacity, pushing those lungs and building back my strength. I’m so grateful for this, it really does make me appreciate life and the chance to enjoy all it offers. I’m hoping things continue like this alongside with this lovely sunshine and the summer days to come.

Misty Norfolk Morning

On a recent stay on the North Norfolk coast, we enjoyed some lovely warm weather. Each day as the tide turned though, it brought in with it rolling mists, which descended over the salt marshes.

It gave a sense of eeriness to the coastline and surrounding countryside, but also some fascination, as the views and scenery transformed dramatically before our eyes. A swift change from feeling warm sunshine to the touch of the damp and moist air.

Here are some pictures that hopefully capture some of those moments, the changing scenes, wildlife and nature.

Rannerdale Bluebells

Before we reach the end of May, the month of bluebells, here’s some more bluebell pictures…

Stepping into what’s known as this secret valley at Rannerdale when the bluebells are in bloom, is like stepping into the Garden of Eden or a Secret Garden. On a sunny day with the bluebells at their fullest, it’s a feast for all the senses – stunning views, heavenly scent and neverending sweeps and swathes of blue across the fells.

It’s a different scene to the one we would normally conjure up when thinking of bluebells – no shady woodlands or trees about to burst into leaf, just acres of English bluebells growing in profusion across the open valley and fells.

The bluebells have a story, according to local folklore, the bluebells are said to have sprung from the spilt blood of slain Norman warriors. The valley was a location where after the Norman invasion of 1066, Britons ambushed and defeated the Norman army at the Battle of Rannerdale. It’s difficult to imagine war raging in such a peaceful, beautiful and tranquil place.

Rannerdale Knotts is a stunning location, with bluebells aside, there are far reaching views over Crummock Water and towards Buttermere and Loweswater.

May Gardens

We’ve had such beautiful and sunny weather so far this May. Gardens are full of colour now and as one plant blooms and fades another starts to spring into life. There’s a continuous flow of vibrant and beautiful flowers, shrubs and trees.

The gorgeous weather has been a great excuse to get out and about with my camera and visit a few special gardens  that are local to us. There’s nothing more uplifting than a sunny day, a walk around a beautiful garden and grounds of an historic house and a little photography.

It’s been lovely to see the blossom trees and tulips of early May, followed by one of my favourites, wisteria clambering and flowering up walls together with sweeping carpets of bluebells and fields of cowslips. The new leaves on the trees and shrubs are so fresh and bright green at this time of year too.

Here’s a few pictures taken at Wrest Park and Hatfield House during May…

Wrest Park:

Hatfield House:

Beautiful Bluebells

I can’t go through the month of May without enjoying the beautiful sight and scents of bluebells. I always equate May with bluebells. Our British weather is a topic of discussion and often complaint, but it’s due to our climate that we are blessed with woodlands, hedgerows, heathlands, fells, meadows and such a wide variety of countryside. These can give rise to perfect conditions to nurture sweeping carpets of bluebells.

There’s nothing like a visit to our local woods on a sunny day to experience the sight and scents of bluebells. It’s breathtaking every year, especially as the sunlight can still reach down through the trees adding to the bright blue glow.

I’m trying to build up my strength and exercise after my recent blip, so what better than to visit our local nature reserve, Mardley Heath, and take a walk around the woods and see the bluebells. Very uplifting!

Enjoy the pics…

Blossoms and Blooms

May has arrived and along with it, some beautiful warm and hot weather. The garden has suddenly burst into full bloom and has transformed itself from a bleak winter garden to a garden rapidly filling with colour. There’s that lovely backdrop of fresh green and newly opened leaves on all the trees and shrubs too. Spring is definitely here now and I think we’ve even had a taste of the summer to come with the Bank Holiday heatwave.

The blossom trees are laden with flowers and the apple blossom tree is the fullest I’ve ever seen it. I don’t know whether it’s because of the weather conditions that it’s so laden with blossom or whether I’m just misleading myself after it’s felt such a long wait to see it after all the harsh weather and winter.

My health has taken a dip over the last month or so, with a chest infection, which then sparked organising pneumonia to flare up in my lungs again, so being on intravenous medication for a few weeks and mostly confined to home, the lovely weather we’ve had on and off has been a huge bonus. It’s been lovely to watch the garden change and come to life and hear the birds singing at their fullest.

Luckily, I managed to avoid staying in hospital and have got myself back on track again now. Attempt number five at the fundoplication operation had to be abandoned due to the pneumonia, so I’m now waiting for a new date to proceed. I just need to build my strength and fitness back up, so onwards and upwards hopefully again now.

It’s been so uplifting to enjoy some sunshine, warm weather and longer days and to be able to potter around outside and enjoy lovely barbeques and eating most meals outdoors. There’s so much blooming in the garden now: poppies, forget-me-nots, peonies, clematis, bridal wreath, phlox to mention a few. It’s hard to keep track as something new keeps appearing each day. May is such a spectacular time in the garden.

It’s still springtime too and there’s still that delicious anticipation of the whole summer stretching out ahead…

Spring Flowers

After all the snow, heavy rain and misty, murky weather, spring has finally arrived at long last. The garden is finally coming alive with colour and plants are finally blooming.

There’s nothing like a daffodil to brighten up a dismal day and we’ve had many of them up to now. The daffodil is a hardy plant, however, perservering through the snow, frosts and wet of late February and March, shining through with its reassurance that spring and warmer days are definitely on the horizon.

The last few weeks has seen constant rain, low and heavy cloud and a dreary mist never far away, but a garden full of bright yellow daffodils has brought some cheer and sunshine and life to the garden at long, long last.

A few days of brighter, warmer weather and suddenly the garden has been bursting into colour, the buds are opening on the trees and shrubs are beginning to flower, starting with the forsythia with its small delicate flowers making another blaze of yellow amongst the daffodils.

Now the tulips are flowering and after a beautiful day’s sunshine have opened up in full, enjoying the sun’s warmth and glow. I brought these tulips back from a visit to Amsterdam’s flower market. Our holiday to Amsterdam marked the first anniversary of my heart and double lung transplant, so when I see the tulips blooming they remind me of a very special time.

The first year these tulips bloomed, there were just five flowers and each year they’ve multiplied and multiplied. This year, despite the awful weather, they’ve bloomed and bloomed and I’ve counted thirty five flower heads so far. They have thrived, which is very symbolic to me, having planted them to mark my first transplant anniversary.

Other little snippets of colours are appearing too – the bright blue of grape hyacinths are popping up around the borders and the magnolias are full of bud and about to flower.

With a few sunny days, we’ve tidied up the summerhouse after the long winter. It’s been lovely to sit up there again with a good book and enjoy the view of the garden springing into life once more.

Ted has enjoyed playing out and getting up to mischief, while Rob has been busy mowing and tidying up after the winter months. I love the feeling of April when there’s the whole anticipation of the spring, summer and autumn ahead to enjoy life outdoors and the fresh air and beauty of the garden.

I love to have daffodils and tulips around the house too, echoing the outside in and cheering up any dismal days and adding even more colour to those bright sunny days.

Spring is such a beautiful and promising time in the garden and the flowers give much hope and anticipation for the months to come.

The weather forecast this week is promising full sunshine and warm temperatures over the next few days at long last. I think most people are looking forward to enjoying some proper springtime. I know I am.