Beautiful Bluebells

I can’t go through the month of May without enjoying the beautiful sight and scents of bluebells. I always equate May with bluebells. Our British weather is a topic of discussion and often complaint, but it’s due to our climate that we are blessed with woodlands, hedgerows, heathlands, fells, meadows and such a wide variety of countryside. These can give rise to perfect conditions to nurture sweeping carpets of bluebells.

There’s nothing like a visit to our local woods on a sunny day to experience the sight and scents of bluebells. It’s breathtaking every year, especially as the sunlight can still reach down through the trees adding to the bright blue glow.

I’m trying to build up my strength and exercise after my recent blip, so what better than to visit our local nature reserve, Mardley Heath, and take a walk around the woods and see the bluebells. Very uplifting!

Enjoy the pics…

Beautiful Benington

We visit Benington Lordship Gardens every year during February when it opens to the public to show off its stunning array of snowdrops. It’s something I always look forward to when we’re in the middle of those cold February days.

There’s something uplifting about seeing that first flush of spring flowers and especially when they are in plentiful displays blanketing the landscape. There are over 200 varieties of snowdrops at Benington. There are also aconites, hellebores, crocuses, winter flowering shrubs as well as beautiful grounds to explore with wonderful views over the Hertfordshire countryside.

In the grounds there’a a very grand neo-norman folly and moat, a walled kitchen garden, sculptures and wildlife pond. The peaceful grounds provide a haven for wildlife. The picturesque village is interesting too, with its duck pond, St Peter’s church and many old thatched roofed buildings. The church holds a series of concerts on Sundays while the gardens are open during February.

For me, snowdrops are a welcome sight as we near the end of winter when nothing much is blooming in the garden and brightening it up. Walking through white blankets of snowdrops is such a delight at this bleak time of year. In British folklore, the snowdrop symbolises hope, which I find very apt. Snowdrops always signify the start of the gardening year beginning to unfold. After the snowdrops fade then the garden begins to bloom more and more and comes back to life and full of colour. Snowdrops are the signal that spring is nearing, the long winter nearly over and sunnier, longer and brighter days are nearly here. Something for us all to look forward to.

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A Captivating Moment

When I’m out and about in the countryside, there always seems to be something that takes me by surprise. I’ve learned from past experience and now that’s why I always try and remember to take my camera or my phone with me. There’s nothing as annoying as seeing something extra special just before your eyes and not being able to capture the moment forever.

We were out walking by the river Bela on Dallham Tower Estate in Cumbria, when we suddenly saw a pair of ears popping out above the river bank. Who was this hiding down there? Suddenly a pair of young fallow deer appeared, nimbly climbing over the steep banking and happily feeding away and munching on the grass.

We were stopped very quietly in our tracks and lucky to be so near. Rob just happened to have his camera at the ready, so was able to snap a few shots while the deer fed and wandered along by the riverside.

It was one of those captivating and special moments…

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