September

It’s difficult to have a favourite month, as every month of the year has something special to offer. There’s always something unique to anticipate as each month looms on the horizon: from the festive month of December and all the hectic preparations for Christmas, to the peace, tranquility and perhaps even snow of January; from the anticipation of lighter evenings and warmer days during those spring months and the sunshine, heat and holidays of the summer.

September has always felt special to me though. I suppose it starts back from school days and the start of the school and academic year being September. September always feels like the time for a fresh start, new learning and new beginnings even more so than January when we’re supposed to reflect on the past year and think about new resolutions for the year ahead.

September was the month when Rob and I chose to get married and the month when I received my life saving transplant, so it’s a month that culminates in celebrations for our family. If I could have chosen which month to have received my transplant, it would have been September. For me, it truly is a month of new beginnings; a month to celebrate life and all it has to offer.

I always look forward to the weather in September, it’s usually cooler after the heat of summer, but still mild enough to be out and about enjoying the sunshine and fresh air. We’re usually lucky during this month as we often have plenty of sunshine and it’s calmer and quieter after the busyness of the school holidays.

We’ve just passed the Autumn Equinox, where the astrological year is marked by the sun crossing the earth’s equator from north to south. This marks the beginning of Autumn, nights drawing in and cooler weather. The meterological year marks the beginning of September as the start of autumn. Whichever way the start of autumn is defined, September is definitely the month where summer somehow manages to gradually ease into autumn. The garden defines this: we still have plenty of summer flowers – annuals still happily flowering along until the first frosts hit, but then many flowers have turned to fruits and berries, ripe for picking and preparing for winter.

For me, September is the month that leads us to crispy autumn walks, cosy warm evenings by the fire, enjoying the last of the warmer weather and then digging out those warmer winter jumpers and clothes. The beginning of a whole new season to embrace.

July Heatwave

We’re at the end of July and it’s passed so quickly. It’s been an incredible month due to the heatwave we’ve been experiencing. The beautiful weather has continued on from springtime and it’s become hotter and hotter throughout July, temperatures reaching over 30 degrees at times. There’s been little rain since May and even then, there wasn’t that much.

Many plants have been flourishing in this heat. The honeysuckle that grows over our front door is always beautiful in July and throughout summer, but this year it’s been even more stunning than ever, brimming full of flowers. The high temperatures have accentuated its strong perfume. On many a hot day and night we’ve had to have all the windows open wide and its heady scent has been noticibly wafting inside when there’s a gentle breeze. It’s just gorgeous.

We’ve been having to water our many pots and baskets every day to keep them healthy as they’ve wilted and struggled in the daily heat, but most have managed to thrive especially the geraniums, which enjoy this Mediterranean type climate. The begonias have done well too, as they are succulents and hold water.

The garden is still looking colourful with the usual July plants flowering: crocosia always give that welcome fiery look in readiness for August; lavenders thrive and are full of busy bees and butterflies; mallow pink anemones buds are opening out and dahlias are thriving with a succession of flower heads one after another, after another.

Crocosia

Anenomes opening out amongst lavenders and daphnes

Lavender borders full of bees and butterflies

Beautiful pink dahlias

The lawn is the biggest giveaway that we’re in the middle of a heatwave. I’ve never seen it so brown, yellow and parched and so early in summer too. We’ve not had to mow it for weeks, which is perhaps a bonus. Hopefully, it will grow back and come green again with some rains or if we have cooler nights and morning dew.

We’ve been trying to get out and about when it’s been cool enough. Everywhere is very dry and dusty and the fields are parched and crops are already golden and being harvested early.

The weather has been so hot and dry that seed heads have just stayed still and haven’t shed in the rain or blown away as they would normally do.

The lavender, wildflower and sunflower fields at Hitchin Lavender, where we visited recently, are thriving in the heat and are an absolutely stunning sight to see amongst the dry and dusty countryside.

I think the heatwave probably sums up July and as we end the month, we’ve had a couple of thunderstorms and some much needed showers of rain, but it’s forecast to hot up again as we head into August… We shall see, but so far it’s been a memorable summer.

Misty Norfolk Morning

On a recent stay on the North Norfolk coast, we enjoyed some lovely warm weather. Each day as the tide turned though, it brought in with it rolling mists, which descended over the salt marshes.

It gave a sense of eeriness to the coastline and surrounding countryside, but also some fascination, as the views and scenery transformed dramatically before our eyes. A swift change from feeling warm sunshine to the touch of the damp and moist air.

Here are some pictures that hopefully capture some of those moments, the changing scenes, wildlife and nature.

Rannerdale Bluebells

Before we reach the end of May, the month of bluebells, here’s some more bluebell pictures…

Stepping into what’s known as this secret valley at Rannerdale when the bluebells are in bloom, is like stepping into the Garden of Eden or a Secret Garden. On a sunny day with the bluebells at their fullest, it’s a feast for all the senses – stunning views, heavenly scent and neverending sweeps and swathes of blue across the fells.

It’s a different scene to the one we would normally conjure up when thinking of bluebells – no shady woodlands or trees about to burst into leaf, just acres of English bluebells growing in profusion across the open valley and fells.

The bluebells have a story, according to local folklore, the bluebells are said to have sprung from the spilt blood of slain Norman warriors. The valley was a location where after the Norman invasion of 1066, Britons ambushed and defeated the Norman army at the Battle of Rannerdale. It’s difficult to imagine war raging in such a peaceful, beautiful and tranquil place.

Rannerdale Knotts is a stunning location, with bluebells aside, there are far reaching views over Crummock Water and towards Buttermere and Loweswater.

Beautiful Bluebells

I can’t go through the month of May without enjoying the beautiful sight and scents of bluebells. I always equate May with bluebells. Our British weather is a topic of discussion and often complaint, but it’s due to our climate that we are blessed with woodlands, hedgerows, heathlands, fells, meadows and such a wide variety of countryside. These can give rise to perfect conditions to nurture sweeping carpets of bluebells.

There’s nothing like a visit to our local woods on a sunny day to experience the sight and scents of bluebells. It’s breathtaking every year, especially as the sunlight can still reach down through the trees adding to the bright blue glow.

I’m trying to build up my strength and exercise after my recent blip, so what better than to visit our local nature reserve, Mardley Heath, and take a walk around the woods and see the bluebells. Very uplifting!

Enjoy the pics…

A Restful Easter

We enjoyed a lovely time this Easter, savouring some very special moments with family.

I wanted Easter to feel extra special after what’s felt like months of starting, stopping and restarting and stopping again with my health. Feeling so well again and having had a good clinic and now having some respite from the stomach operation, I just wanted to make the most of life and put some of the health related stresses behind us.

Also, casting my mind back to last Easter, when I was just out of hospital and still too unwell to enjoy it properly, it felt especially important to make the most of this Easter, live life to the full and try and become even more healthier.

With this in mind, we treated ourselves to a lovely few days on the North Norfolk coast, renting a house there and Sarah, Oli and baby Freddie joined us, which was lovely. North Norfolk is a favourite place of ours. We enjoy the walking, the spectacular beaches, countryside and wildlife, and in between all the exploring there’s plenty of good pubs and cafes to relax in too.

It’s a very dog friendly place, so we always bring Ted and Alfie with us and get lots of enjoyment from trying out different walks with them. Many of the pubs and cafes allow dogs inside too, so we can keep them with us when we want to eat out or go for coffee, which all adds to the fun.

We enjoyed some beautiful sunshine and explored both new places and favourite places we’d visited before. I especially enjoyed being out and about again with my camera in such stunning places and I found being by the seaside and in the countryside very uplifting and motivating with all fresh air and extra walking – all adding to improving my health hopefully.

One very special moment was seeing Freddie toddling on the beach for the first time at Brancaster in his first pair of tiny wellingtons. He loved it and both the dogs loved running free alongside him. We had a lovely Sunday lunch afterwards with the dogs sleeping at our feet and Freddie in his high chair tucking hungrily into his food. Simple pleasures, but very special ones.

Thornham village where we stayed had a good dog friendly pub – The Orange Tree – they even had a menu board especially for dogs. It also had a great deli with a dog friendly cafe, so on some days we found ourselves just enjoying some local coastal walks around the salt marshes and then either popping into the pub or deli for meals or drinks on our way round. Again, simple pleasures, but all very relaxing.

Following our lovely and relaxing Norfolk trip, it was time to enjoy Easter weekend. We weren’t so lucky with the weather, but that didn’t really matter so much, as we had a full house on Easter Sunday and Monday, with everyone stopping round. On Easter Saturday, we had a lovely day cooking and preparing food and we enjoyed a lovely family meal and Easter egg hunt on Easter Sunday and a very relaxing and lazy Easter Monday.

Now we’ve reached April, I’m really hoping for some WARM and sunny weather and getting back out in the garden again.

Here are a few Easter pics…

Flooding Estuary

With all my health problems this winter it had meant we hadn’t been able to visit the Lake District for a good few months and we’d had to cancel some visits in autumn and over Christmas. When we visited at long last the other week, when we arrived near Milnthorpe and drove past the River Bela, as always I looked over the dry stone walls to see how high the river was.

It was extemely high, reaching the tops of the river bank and spilling over. The following morning there were actually warnings locally not to venture out on the estuary footpaths or down by the coastal path at Arnside, as tidal surges were expected to cause more high waters and flooding. Our neighbour told us, the river and estuary area had been flooded at least three times since we’d last visited.

The Rivers Bela and Kent estuaries meet and join the sea in Morecambe Bay. The last big flood in Milnthorpe was after Storm Desmond in 2015, when houses near the river and the football and cricket ground were flooded. People near the river were preparing for the worst again piling up the sand bags to protect their properties and moving furniture upstairs.

The river and estuary landscapes look so different in flood. The River Bela had lost all its boundaries as it merged with the sea and River Kent. The estuary itself looked like another huge Lake District lake, especially with the Lake District mountains in the back drop. There are usually big pools of water and stretches of sand and sand banks with flocks of interesting birds feeding: on this day just stretches of neverending and unsettled waters.

A drive further around the coast to Sandside was almost inaccessible with sea water lashing and blowing across the main road in the blustery and wild wind. Then the following day, the river had calmed down and you could distinguish it from the estuary once more. Overnight and at low tide, the water in the estuary had receded back to safer levels and there were only sand deposits on the road marking the hazards of the day before.

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