Beautiful Bluebells

I can’t go through the month of May without enjoying the beautiful sight and scents of bluebells. I always equate May with bluebells. Our British weather is a topic of discussion and often complaint, but it’s due to our climate that we are blessed with woodlands, hedgerows, heathlands, fells, meadows and such a wide variety of countryside. These can give rise to perfect conditions to nurture sweeping carpets of bluebells.

There’s nothing like a visit to our local woods on a sunny day to experience the sight and scents of bluebells. It’s breathtaking every year, especially as the sunlight can still reach down through the trees adding to the bright blue glow.

I’m trying to build up my strength and exercise after my recent blip, so what better than to visit our local nature reserve, Mardley Heath, and take a walk around the woods and see the bluebells. Very uplifting!

Enjoy the pics…

Singlers Marsh

We had another glorious winter day. The weather was bitter cold and breezy again, but the skies were clear and blue and it seemed a perfect day to get out in the fresh air again with the camera. I love being outdoors and amongst nature: I find it so healthy and refreshing and it always raises my spirits. Rob and I are always eager to explore local places and new walks with our cocker spaniel, Ted.

When I first moved to this area, I used to come down to Singlers Marsh in Old Welwyn to walk my old staffy bull terrier. She used to love diving in and out of the water and collecting rocks and stones.

It’s been many years since I’ve walked down there, but every time Rob and I visit Old Welwyn, I keep saying we must take a look down by the river again and explore with Ted.

It seemed the perfect day and Old Welwyn is only 5 minutes away from us. I’m still trying to build up my walking capacity and as it was freezing cold, I didn’t want to be venturing too far away. I also knew that the first part of the walk was lovely and level, which is a great help with my breathing.

Singlers Marsh is a wet meadow adjacent to the River Mimram on the northern edge of Old Welwyn in Hertfordshire. The marsh comprises a section of important chalk river and lowland flood meadows. It was quite waterlogged in places being mid winter and I was glad I had my wellingtons on. The grassland, willow scrub and mature trees attract a wide range of wildlife, especially plants of wet meadows, insects and birds including summer visiting ones.

It was a very blustery day and the cold and wind inhibit my breathing quite a bit at the moment, but I managed to walk along the flat ground and follow the first section of the walk and back again. Then we drove on into Old Welwyn village and stopped at one of the pubs there to warm up with a hot dinner – the White Hart.

A lovely look out and we’ll definitely be back to see those spring and summer flowers and hopefully in warmer and less windy weather.  With plenty more physio over the next month or two, I’m hoping I’ll be able to walk further and explore a little more.

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Views at Gosmore

We happened upon this beautiful place some time ago, when we  arranged to meet a dog sitter, who was going to look after Ted our cocker spaniel while we went away on holiday. She wanted us to walk our dogs together to see if they got on well with each other before she had Ted come to stay with her. She arranged to meet us here at Gosmore.

Gosmore is a hamlet situated very near to the town of Hitchin in Hertfordshire. We pass the signs for Gosmore every time we drive into Hitchin, but we had no idea from the road side what beautiful and stunning countryside lay behind the lovely village houses there.

All you need to do is turn in to Gosmore at the large roundabout where the Three Moorhens pub is situated on the outskirts of Hitchin and then turn into Brick Kiln Lane. On this road, you can easily park up and there are a couple of small lanes that lead you out between the houses and onto the pathways of the stunning countryside.

You can walk in all directions along bridleways and pathways through stunning Hertfordshire countryside. Here are just a few photographs of the countryside views on a glorious and cold January day. The countryside is stunning at all times of year. Visit in June when the fields look beautiful full of red poppies and wildflowers. We will definitely be back then.

Take a look…

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A Little Wander Around Preston Village

A few weeks now into January and it was wonderful to wake up to brilliant sunshine and blue skies at long last. A bright, crisp, bitter cold and clear day.  We decided to take a drive around the local countryside and take a few photographs here and there. We’re often busy and wrapped up in our daily comings and goings and sometimes forget what is just under our own noses and in the hum drum of our regular routines stop seeing what is there is to be appreciated.

We visited a pretty village called Preston (Hertfordshire) and stopped to take some photographs. Preston is a small village roughly 3 miles near to Hitchin and 300 miles north of London. The village dates back to at least 1086, when it was mentioned in the ‘Hundred’, also known as the ‘Half Hundred of Hiz (referring to Hitchen and mentioned in the Doomesday Book). There’s a thriving village pub, the Red Lion, which is the first community owned pub in Britain.

Take a look around…

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Interesting village monument

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Picturesque homes and cottages

 

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Traditional village phone booth and post box
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Bare winter trees on the village green
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More pretty homes
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Pretty village green with the Red Lion pub in prime position

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